Yokohama is aptly seen as the traditional gateway to Japan, the funnel through which Japan welcomed foreign ideas, technology, and people. Sometimes we forget that the port is also a point of embarkation. This makes Yokohama an appropriate home for the Japan Overseas Migration Museum, which celebrates the history of Japanese that left their home islands to start new lives and new communities across the oceans.

The story of Japanese overseas migration began in the 19th century when farmers started to trickle into Hawaii to work on sugar plantations. The early migrants were some of the first modern Japanese to leave their country. The work was intense, but some were able to save enough money to return to their villages to live well and tell their stories. As the migrant life became more popular, Japanese started settling the western United States and Canada. Many came to the New World as laborers or as students seeking skills that they could use to help along the modernizations of the Meiji period. Immigration into the United States was effectively halted in response to widespread anti-Japanese sentiment, and later, war and internment. Japanese migrants then began to seek their fortunes in Latin America, where they introduced very useful Asian crops such as pepper and formed successful urban and agricultural communities that still exist today.

The history told here is a people’s history. Although the Japanese Diaspora has born many notable leaders such as Patsy Mink and Alberto Fujimori, the exhibition here focuses on the daily lives of a people in a different context. Visitors really get a sense of what sorts of lives these migrants and the subsequent generations of Nikkei lived, struggled, and prospered in their chosen homes.

The museum is free to enter. All exhibits are extensively explained with adequate historical context in both Japanese and English with some parts offered in Portuguese and Spanish. There is enough information here to enthrall even the most seasoned history buff. The museum is housed on the second floor of the Japan International Cooperation Agency’s Yokohama office, so if the exhibit dredges up some wanderlust in you, you can head downstairs for information about becoming an Overseas Volunteer.

横浜はかつてここを通して外国の技術や風習が入って来た日本の古い玄関口とされているが、同時に海外に出るための乗船港でもあった。そういった背景からここ横浜に日本人の海外移住の歴史と移住者の現在の姿を伝える「海外移住資料館」があるのだろう。

日本人の海外移住の歴史は19世紀、人々がハワイでサトウキビ栽培を行なうために移住し始めた頃にさかのぼる。当時のモダンな考え方を持っていた彼らはハワイで一生懸命働き、中には貯めたお金をもって故郷に帰ってきて裕福な生活をする者もあった。その後も移住者は増え、ハワイのみならずアメリカ西部やカナダにも移住する者が出てきた。働くための新天地を求めてやってくる者が多かったが、移住者の中には技術や知識を身に付けて帰国し明治における日本の近代化に貢献した者も多かった。米国への移住者の増加はやがて米国民の間に反日感情を抱かせることになり、やがてそれは戦争に発展し移住者たちは強制収容されたりした。やがて海外移住者たちは新天地をラテンアメリカに求め、そこに日本から唐辛子など有用な作物を持ち込んで栽培し、都会や農村に日系人のコミュニティーを形成し現在に至っている。

「海外移住資料館」で紹介されているのは海外に移住した人々の歴史である。日本からの海外移住者の中からはパッツィー・ミンクやアルベルト・フジモリなどの有名な指導者も多く出たが、この資料館で主に紹介されているのはそういった有名人ではなく、一般の移住者たちの日々の暮らしぶりである。来館者は当時の移住者たちとその子孫たちが経験してきた様々な苦難、そして手に入れた幸福な暮らしの様子を理解できるようになっている。

入館は無料。展示物はすべて日本語と英語によって歴史的な背景などの詳細な説明が付いていて分かりやすい。中にはポルトガル語やスペイン語で解説されている展示物もあり、歴史に詳しい人でも充分楽しめるような充実の内容。場所は「JICA横浜」の2階なので展示を見て海外に行きたいという気持ちになったら1階に下りれば海外ボランティアになるための情報がすぐに手に入る。

Japan Overseas Migration Museum

Address 住所:
Naka-ku Shinko 2-3-1
中区新港2−3−1
Tel: 045-663-3257

Hours/営業時間: 10:00-18:00
(入館は17:30まで/last entry at 17:30)

毎週月曜日と12月29日から1月3日までは休館。月曜日が祝日の場合は翌火曜日が休館。入館無料。

Closed Mondays and Dec. 29-Jan. 3. When Monday falls on a holiday, the museum will be closed on Tuesday. Admission is free.